9 Summer Specific New Jersey Home Situations Solved

Dated: 06/18/2017

Views: 194


On your search to buy your New Jersey home this summer, you’re bound to run into a few summer-specific home issues, such as sticky doors and mosquito swarms. Don’t let these small problems sway your home-buying decision---easy fixes exist for most with just a little post-home-purchase effort.  Read on for 9 common issues and the simple ways to solve them:

Solve 9 common summer-specific NJ home issues!


#1 Mosquito Masses:

These ubiquitous party crashers suck the fun out of any New Jersey home outdoor event.

What to do:

  • Clean the gutters. “That’s often a main, and neglected, breeding site for mosquitoes,” says Chris Enroth, a horticulture educator with the University of Illinois Extension office in Macomb.

  • Plug in a fan. Or install a ceiling fan. “Mosquitoes don’t like flying in high wind,” Enroth says. Cheers for cool breezes sans bug bites!

#2 Doors That Stick

Wooden doors swell on humid days, outgrowing their jambs (what holds doors steady as you open and close them), causing an annoyingly sticky situation.

What to do:

  • Tighten the hinge screws. There’s a chance the door’s just slipped out of alignment.

  • Scale back the weather stripping. Weather stripping installed in the winter to keep out drafts, may be too thick come summer.

  • Shave down the door. As a last resort, use a planer or sander to trim down the door ever so slightly, concentrating on the area with a visibly worn finish. Seal the newly exposed edge with paint or wood sealant to block out future humidity.

#3 Weeds in Patio Cracks

Besides ruining a well-manicured view, resilient weeds crack and shift pavement.

What to do:

  • Block new growth. Fill the weed-free cracks with asphalt or cement crack filler, sand, or corn gluten meal, which prevents future germination.

  • Pull ‘em. Especially if you don’t want to use an herbicide, which can spread and damage desirable plants. Sorry!

#4 Faded Flooring from Harsh Sun

We want to throw open the shades and revel in that summer sunshine, but UV rays lead to faded and dry flooring.

What to do:

  • Add transparent window film. It shuts out 99% of UVA and UVB rays without blocking sunlight or a welcome view. Today’s films are undetectable when properly installed and won’t tint the light coming into your home.

#5 Deck Splinters

As long as the decking’s in otherwise good shape, bare feet needn’t suffer through a gauntlet of splinters.

What to do:

  • Resurface it. Apply one of the newer deck restoration products that essentially gives your deck a coating that prevents splinters. This works best for small splinters, before they’ve gotten too bad.

  • Sand it. Best for deep and big splinters. Then apply a water-repelling, UV-resistant sealer.

#6 Dust Mites

New Jersey dust mite populations peak in summer’s heat and humidity, inflicting stuffy noses, sneezing, and coughing upon those who are allergic.

What to do:

  • Make your new home inhospitable. Clean frequently and use your AC to keep indoor humidity to 50% or less.

#7 Slamming Screen Doors

Slam. Slam. Slam. Annoying, right? Beyond rattling your bliss, this sound of summer damages the hinges of your new home’s screen door.

What to do:

  • Adjust the door closer. If the door has a closer, find the perfect bang-free tension by simply turning the screw on pneumatic models or rotating the body on hydraulic styles.

  • Add a closer. It costs just $10 to $20 to retrofit an older screen door.

  • Apply felt pads to the door frame. How’s that for a low-cost option?

#8 A Patio or Deck That Burns Your Feet

Hot dogs and burgers should be the only things you risk burning on your new home’s patio this summer.

What to do:

  • Throw some shade. Position an umbrella or pergola over frequently used areas.

  • Add an outdoor rug. Choose a lighter color that won’t absorb as much heat. Plastic styles, in particular, are touted for keeping their cool.

  • Refinish the surface. Again, choose a lighter color. Resurfacing products and overlays exist for all types of patio and deck surfaces.

#9 Ugly, Dried-Out Brown Grass

Widespread browning, rather than patches of brown grass, has two common causes: lawn care oversights and a cool-season grass going dormant.

What to do:

  • Sharpen or replace mower blades. This could be all that’s needed if just the tips of the grass are brown and jagged.

  • Set the blade height to three inches. When you take less off the top, it helps grass absorb water before it evaporates.

  • Water less frequently, for longer periods of time. This helps grass develop deeper, drought- and disease-resistant roots. Aim for 1 to 1.5 inches of water a week, and even a cool-season grass keeps its green during the summer.

Summer Situations Solved

See? With a little time and effort, most small summertime home annoyances are solvable. Call Lynn Garafola at Team Nest Builder, buy that New Jersey dream home and get to work. But those summer guests that simply won’t leave?  That’s a whole ‘nother problem!

Source:  HouseLogic.com

 



Latest Blog Posts

COMING SOON Spacious Private 5BR Sparta Home

341 West Mountain Road offers a light-and-space filled respite set in the beautiful Sparta woodlands.Quiet and private, this 5BR, 2.5 Bathroom home features a home office, a family room with a

Read More

Why Buying A Home Is Better Than Renting

People often ask if now is a good time to buy a home in New Jersey, but nobody ever asks whether or not it’s a good time to rent. Regardless, Team Nest Builder wants to make certain that everyone

Read More

5 Fab Fathers Day Happenings In Sussex And Morris Counties

Father’s Day hits this Sunday--what do YOU have planned? Team Nest Builder offers a slew of Father’s Day fun in Morris and Sussex Counties. Read on and surprise Dad with cool activities! (Be

Read More

OPEN HOUSE Sunday For Sparta Mountain 4BR Dream Home

Perched handsomely on an acre in the beautiful Sparta Mountain community, 28 Waters Edge offers a 4BR 2.5 Bathroom home with space and style. Come see for yourself this Sunday, June 17th, from 1

Read More